Family Tyes SC - Gullah Gal

Gullah Galz Ink

To Youth Everywhere Solace

Providing creative arts, cultural & family programming to holistically
impact the self esteem and self concepts of culturally diverse youth.

FTSC’s foundation focuses on programs and services
related to the universal concepts of Gullah Geechee culture.


Black America Series: Georgetown County, SC

Gullah Gal, Ramona La Roche, is the Founder of Family TYES SC. She is a graduate of Columbia College in South Carolina, the School of Visual Arts in New York City. Ramona returned to her ancestral home several years ago, and has been writing and actively listening to her guardian spirits since. Her first book, Black America Series: Georgetown County, SC by Arcadia Publishers, SC, printed in 2000 covers agriculture, commerce, industry, political, spiritual life, and recreational aspects of this culturally rich, rice producing landmark of South Carolina low country.

This book is currently out of print. If you are interested in purchasing a copy, please contact Arcadia Publishing, Mt. Pleasant SC.

Orisa Yoruba Gods and Spiritual Identity in Africa and the Diaspora

Orisa Yoruba Gods & Spiritual Identity in Africa and the Diaspora
 - Toyin Falola and Ann Genova, editors.

"Gullah Connections: Crossing Over, Passing, the Links between the worlds" - written by Ramona La Roche.

The imagery and the rites of passage often associated with that of crossing over, passing (on), or stepping have long been associated with transcendence from one world to another. There is always an ascension of sorts, connected with such acts. The author explores the African Diaspora’s spiritual link between the people from the shores of the Western motherland, to the Gullahs (Geechees) of the coastal Southeastern low country.


Family TYES SC™
A division of Gullah Galz Ink
PO Box 1101   Pawleys Island SC 29585
843-240-0921     
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America is woven of many strands....  Our fate is to become one, and yet many. Ralph Ellison 1952